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Based on Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary
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cull, culled, culling, culls.transitive verbs
to remove rejected members or parts from (a herd, or population {totalitarianism} for example); to pick out from others; select; to gather; collect for removal from
cull.noun
something picked out from others, especially something rejected because of inferior quality
culler.noun

cynical.adjective
scornful of the motives, virtue, or integrity of others (a cynical distrust of friendly strangers); a cynical view of the average voter's intelligence; expressing or exhibiting scorn and bitter mockery
cynically.adverb
cynicalness.nouns
cynicism.noun
a scornful, bitterly mocking attitude or quality (the public cynicism aroused by governmental scandals); a scornful, bitterly mocking comment or act; Cynicism the beliefs of the ancient Cynics (members of a sect of ancient Greek philosophers who believed virtue to be the only good and self control to be the only means of achieving virtue)
cynic.noun
a person who believes all people are motivated by selfishness
cynic.adjective

Nadia Comaneci.1961- , Romanian born gymnast, a favorite of fans and the media at the 1976 Olympic Games in Montréal, Québec, Canada, where she won three gold medals and a bronze medal in individual competition, and a silver medal for the Romanian team's second-place finish. At the Olympics she became the first gymnast to receive a perfect score from the judges, earning a 10.00 in the uneven-bars event, and she led Romania to the silver medal in the team competition.

Born in Oneti, Comaneci was noticed by renowned Romanian gymnastics coach Bela Karolyi (who later emigrated to the United States) when she was six years old. Karolyi recruited her for the Romanian junior gymnastics team, and in 1970 she won the national junior championship. Comaneci continued winning in her age group and collected other junior titles until she began senior competition in 1975, when she entered the European championships, winning the all-around title and three individual events..Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99. © 1993-1998 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

cytidine.noun
a nucleotide; a white, crystalline nucleotide, C9H13N3O5, (9 parts {molecules} carbon, 13 parts hydrogen, 3 parts nitrogen, 5 parts oxygen) composed of one molecule each of cytosine and ribose.

cytoplasm.noun
the jelly like material (membrane) containing plasmids which surrounds the cell nucleus, differentiated from ectoplasm and endoplasm. The cytoplasm of cells is involved in the synthesis, modification, and transport of cellular materials to the nucleus.(the 'city' centre) by means of filaments formed by proteins-(what would the body do without its proteins, they are so important) which extend from the nuclear membrane passageways and into the cell's nucleus. (like a train station with hallways leading one to his particular boarding place for his train) 

"The nucleus is like Manhatten, very crowded and the traffic needs to go smoothly and fast." ... Nobel prize winner Günter Blobel.

The transfer process necessary for a new protein to fufill its purpose is recognized by another protein which pilots (you meet someone in the train station who takes you get to where your train is) it to a gigantic (for a cell, ha!) membrane passageway wherein masses of other proteins, RNAs, etc. are moving about (Grand Central Station fashion) on filaments that comprise the cytoskeleton but this new one is correctly conveyed through the membrane to its destination.

cytosine.noun
a pyrimidine base, C4H5N3O, that is an essential constituent of RNA and DNA.

cytoskeleton.noun
a network of fibres permeating the matrix of living cells that provide a supporting framework for organelles and anchors the cell, etc. the fibres are composed of microtubules and actin-microfilaments

cessation.noun
a bringing or coming to an end; a ceasing; cease

contract.noun
an agreement between two or more parties
contract, contracted, contracting, contracts.verbs
transitive verb use.to reduce in size by drawing together; shrink; to pull together; wrinkle; to enter into by contract; establish or settle by formal agreement (contract a vehicle, a house); to acquire or incur.(contract obligations)
intransitive verb use.to become reduced in size by or as if by being drawn together (the pupils of the patient's eyes contracted in the sun); to enter into or make an agreement (contract for garbage collection)
contractibility.or.contractibleness.noun
contractible.adjective

commiserate, commiserated, commiserating, commiserates.transitive verbs
to feel or express sorrow or pity for; sympathize with
intransitive use.to feel or express sympathy.(commiserated over their failure)
commiserative.adjective
commiseratively.adverb
commiserator.noun

commiseration.noun
the feeling or expression of pity or sorrow

coalesce, coalesced, coalescing, coalesces.intransitive verbs
to grow together; fuse; to come together so as to form one whole; unite; mix
coalescence.noun
coalescent.adjective

coeval.adjective
originating or existing during the same period; lasting through the same era
coeval.noun
one of the same era or period; a contemporary
coevally.adverb

chafe, chafed, chafing, chafes.verbs
transitive use.to wear away or irritate by rubbing; to annoy; vex; to warm by rubbing, as with the hands
intransitive use.to rub and cause irritation or friction (the high collar chafed against my neck); to become worn or sore from rubbing; to feel irritated or impatient (chafed at the delay)
chafe.noun
warmth, wear, or soreness produced by friction; annoyance; vexation

cadence.noun, plural.cadences
balanced, rhythmic flow, as of poetry or oratory; rhythm; the measure or beat of movement, as in dancing or marching; a falling inflection of the voice, as at the end of a sentence; general inflection or modulation of the voice
Music.-.a progression of chords moving to a harmonic close or point of rest
cadenced.adjective

conspiracy theorist.noun
someone who postulates on the idea that many important geopolitical events or economic and societal trends are the products of secret plots that are generally unknown
to the public at large

Canada Gazette
Ontario's first newspaper, the Upper Canada Gazette, was an official government publication appearing in 1793. All official commissions are still proclaimed in the 'Gazette'.

Canada 1867 map

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