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Based on Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary
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theory.noun,-theories.plural.(compare theorem)
a looking at; a mental viewing; an explanation; theories are sets of rules and equations which describe subjective findings
theorize, theorized, theorizing, theorizes.verbs
intransitive verb use.to formulate theories or a theory; speculate
transitive verb use.to propose a theory about
theorization, theorizer.nouns

To establish a theory (for future expansion thereupon), references in the theory must be tethered to a firm, secure, recognized and accepted point of validity. With this as a base, a theory generally then is a well substantiated explanation of some aspect of the natural world that can incorporate facts, laws, inferences, and tested hypothesis. A theory provides evidence to the mind having accepted it. So we have pseudo scientists and exacting scientists (physical sciences). 

However, in actuality, theories lacking such substantiation, such as the evolutionary theory, are in reality just concocted-fables, and are little no more than just accepted information.

Therefore a theory must: 1) provide reasonable explanation to reduce ambiguity on a fact perceptible by the senses; 2) satisfy the principle of correspondence (integrate any relevant existing tenets of a theory it intends to supersede; 3) provide a basis for empirical testing of new postulates
   Compare 'fact'.

theoretical also theoretic.adjective
of, relating to, or based on theory; restricted to theory; not practical (theoretical physics) given to theorizing; speculative
theoretically.adverb

theory of relativity.noun
Einstein's General Theory of Relativity (has to do with the very large the universe)-distinguishes from the original theory of relativity which left out gravity and which is now known as the Special Theory of Relativity. The General Theory of Relativity (included gravity) indicates that gravity distorts time. This effect has been measured experimentally, many times. Clocks at the top of tall buildings, where gravity is slightly less, run faster than those at the bottom, just as predicted by the equations of general relativity. 

The General Theory of Relativity predicts the curvature of each small volume of space, based on matter and energy it contains. It describes the structure of changing gravitational fields as applied to matter in outer space, and has proven to be a valid way to view large scale phenomena. Relativity presupposes that the four dimensions of space and time (3 space and 1 time) may be combined as 1 geometric unit called spacetime. Unfortunately the theory of relativity (describing the large) and that of quantum mechanics-(describing the tiny) don't fit together, leading scientists to head toward the theory of everything

Einstein showed that gravity is not a force resulting from objects themselves (Newtonian physics) but that it results from the curvature of spacetime in the presence of matter and energy.

Explore Newtonian Gravitation and Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, and explore the man many regard as more brilliant than Einstein
http://www-history.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/history/Mathematicians/Von_Neumann.html-
and another four persons perhaps just as brilliant and more so:

1)."An equation means nothing to me unless it expresses a thought of God."....Srinivasa Ramanujan
http://www-history.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/history/Mathematicians/Ramanujan.html

2 & 3) Tom Bearden and John Bedini

4) Dr. John Hagelin
and of course there are so many others, each unique, each brilliant.

As Einstein.(Einstein's bio).pointed out, the Universe is constantly in controlled motion, without which, its reality would not exist; and that gravity is the equivalent of matter in motion, and a piece of matter is a curvature of the space time continuum, which retains shape by the dark matter's pressure.."Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one." ...Einstein.

E=mc2 is an equation calculating energy potential Einstein developed in 1905, and is that, within a given mass (m) the amount of energy potential (E) is equal to the mass when multiplied by the square of the velocity of light (c). Thus, tiny amounts of mass have widespread amounts of energy potential).
   According to Dr Masaru Emoto, E=mc2 is that Energy equals the number of people and the square of people's consciousness.

According to Einstein's 1915 theory of relativity, an accelerating mass produces gravitational waves in the same fashion as waves are produced when you accelerate water by putting your hand in a still pool. Einstein predicted that gravitational waves also travel at the speed of light. Einstein tried to reconcile his theory.

The theory includes:
1) there is no observable absolute motion, only relative motion (when we observe something, it is from our point of view which is also in motion the earth is moving; 2) the velocity (speed) of light is constant (doesn't vary) and is not dependent on the motion of the source;
3) no energy can be transmitted at a velocity greater than that of light;
4) the mass of the body in motion is a function of the energy content and varies with the velocity;
5)-time is relative;
6) space and time are interdependent and form a four dimension continuum (a continuous whole);
7) the presence of matter results in a 'warping' (a twist or bend, as in a wet piece of wood drying out and looking different from its original shape) of the space time continuum, so that a body in motion passing near by will describe a curve, this being the effect known as gravitation, as evidenced by the deflection of light (as a mirror like surface can deflect the Sun's light to a different direction) passing through a gravitational field.


"It's not that I'm so smart, it's just that I stay with problems longer."
"Humanity needs a substantial new way of thinking if we are to survive."
"The ideals that have lighted my way, and time after time have given me new courage to face life cheerfully, have been kindness, beauty and truth."
Once we understand the mind of God, all else is just details.
...Albert Einstein, 1879-1955, physicist

tenable.adjective
capable of being maintained in argument; rationally defensible (a tenable theory, unlike the theory of evolution); capable of being held against assault; defensible
tenability or tenableness.noun
tenably.adverb

therewith.adverb
with that, this, or it; in addition to that; immediately thereafter

tendency.noun,.plural.tendencies
movement or prevailing movement in a given direction (observed the tendency of the wind; the shoreward tendency of the current); a characteristic likelihood (fabric that has a tendency to  wrinkle); a predisposition to think, act, behave, or proceed in a particular way; an implicit direction or purpose or point of view in written or spoken matter; a bias
tendencious.adjective.(variant of tendentious)
tendentious also tendencious.adjective
marked by a strong implicit point of view
tendentiously.adverb
tendentiousness.noun

treaty.noun,.plural.treaties
a formal agreement between two or more states, as in reference to terms of peace or trade; the document in which such an agreement is set down; a contract or an agreement

tribunal.noun
a committee or board appointed to adjudicate in a particular matter; something that has the power to determine or judge (the tribunal of public opinion); a seat or court of justice; the bench on which a judge or other presiding officer sits in court

tariff.noun
a list or system of duties imposed by a government on imported or exported goods; duties or a duty imposed by a government on imported or exported goods; a schedule of prices or fees
tariff, tariffed, tariffing, tariffs.transitive verbs
to fix a duty or price on

tinkle, tinkled, tinkling, tinkles.verbs
intransitive verb use.to make light metallic sounds, as those of a small bell
transitive verb use.to cause to tinkle; to signal or call by tinkling
tinkle.noun
a light, clear metallic sound or a sound suggestive of it; the act of tinkling
tinkly.adjective

tinge, tinged, tinging.or.tingeing, tinges.transitive verbs
to apply a trace of color to; tint; to affect slightly, as with a contrasting quality; a small amount of a color incorporated or added; a slight added element, property, or influence (a tinge of regret)

travail.noun
work, especially when arduous or involving painful effort; toil; tribulation or agony; anguish
travail, travailed, travailing, travails.intransitive verbs
to work strenuously; toil; work hard

telepathy.noun
communication through means other than the senses, as by the exercise of an occult power
telepathic.adjective
telepathically.adverb
telepathist.noun

tense, tenser, tensest.adjectives
lightly stretched; taut; stiff; tight nervous tension
tense, tensed, tensing, tenses.transitive and intransitive verbs
to make or become tense
tensely.adverb
tenseness.noun
tense.(grammar)
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